Heating

buy Lyrica online from mexico Builders who adopt a whole-home approach to building design consider the home as a single system consisting of interdependent parts. Framing, walls, insulation, windows, doors, lighting, HVAC and other components of the built environment are evaluated for how they perform in relation to each other, to the local climate and expected occupant behavior.

Lower Loads

watch In high-performance homes, the interdependent parts work together to produce personalized comfort, healthy spaces and energy efficiency. The foundation of energy efficiency is a tight thermal envelope designed to reduce cooling and heating loads. Previously, some builders may have selected oversized HVAC systems in the hopes of guaranteeing comfort and limiting callbacks, but this approach is costly and inefficient, particularly in homes with tight thermal envelopes. An oversized system is likely to waste energy and cause temperature swings along with ineffective moisture removal by short cycling: constantly turning on and off. HVAC systems specified for high performance homes must be able to accommodate low loads.

Load and Lifestyle

Room-by-room load calculations (ACCA Manual J®) and the process of identifying the right system size (ACCA Manual S®) are both based upon ASHRAE design temperatures which account for the coolest and hottest days of the year. For most of the year, temperatures will not reach either extreme. Also, loads will change over the course of a day, varying based on how occupants use a space. The homeowner’s bedroom and home office will have radically different conditioning needs than a 50-person dance studio built in a basement, for example.

High-performance HVAC systems with variable capacity, such as Zoned Comfort Solutions®, are able to limit energy consumption to the amount needed to cool and heat rooms to their set point and immediately vary capacity as loads change. Coupled with zoning, this level of precision means builders can reduce the risk of callbacks by specifying systems that align with room-by-room load calculations and keep occupants comfortable whether they are in the kitchen or a bonus room turned yoga studio.

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Lower the Risk of Callbacks

A dual-fuel or hybrid system is the combination of an electric heat pump and a natural gas furnace. This system uses the heat pump’s outdoor condensing unit to heat your home using only electricity. The gas furnace comes into play when temperatures are below 35 degrees. ...continue reading

MENLO PARK − Host, Sarah Rutan: If you’re thinking about switching to solar power in your home, you should also consider installing a heat pump for your HVAC system. Today we’re in Menlo Park with Diamond Certified Expert Contributor Mike Rebholtz of Alternative Heating & Conditioning Solutions to learn more.

Diamond Certified Expert Contributor Mike Rebholtz: I’m here today to talk about heat pumps. A lot of people are questioning, you know, what is a heat pump? What do they do? How will it heat my home? Does it air condition well? Is it efficient? And I really start talking to people about heat pumps when we’re talking about if they have solar and they want to start getting off the grid or if they’re on propane and they don’t want to use propane to heat their home. They want to use electricity. So, when we heat and cool on a heat pump, we’re doing it with electricity.

They’ve become very efficient. They’ve become a lot more – they produce a lot more heat than they used to. We’ve gone from an R22 refrigerant to a 410A refrigerant, which means that it could produce six to ten degrees more heat than they ever used to. Efficiencies have gotten much better. They’ve gone to variable-speed compressors, which are very efficient. And they don’t pull a lot of energy off the grid immediately. They just gradually come up. And so we find that heat pumps have a really good place here in the Peninsula with a lot of people that are doing solar.

Host, Sarah Rutan: To learn more from local top rated companies, visit our Diamond Certified Expert Reports at experts.diamondcertified.org.
- See more at: http://experts.diamondcertified.org/video-advancements-heat-pump-technology/#sthash.TAEqcRSq.dpuf

Nowadays gas furnaces are divided into two groups based upon their energy efficiency: the 80% efficient group (standard efficiency or SE), and the over 90% efficient group (high efficiency or HE). When you look at the various manufacturers, they tend to have three models to choose from within each group; a single stage furnace, a two stage, and a variable speed unit. ...continue reading